Honda Pacific Coast PC800 links and information

This page contains a collection of links and information organized in a way that makes sense to me. I did this for my own benefit and organized it as such.  This is not a complete or exhaustive list, just a way for me to organize some information.  If there is a topic that you’d like me to add, a write-up of a procedure that you’d like me to link to, or anything else that I should be doing on this page, drop me a note in the comments below or send me a message through the “Contact” link above.

NOTE NOTE NOTE: The absolute best place to go for answers to your questions is the IPCRC.  It is without a doubt the best online community dedicated to a specific motorcycle (our beloved PC800s!) that I have ever heard of or been a part of.  Without all of the wonderful people on the IPCRC, 99.999% of the information on this page wouldn’t be available and I probably wouldn’t have bought a PC800.  If you own a PC800 and want to be part of a great community, consider signing up for the IPCRC, saying hello, asking a question, and answering one or two questions, too.  It is well worth your while!

NOTE NOTE NOTE: Leland Sheppard recently moved servers for his host of websites.  If you get a 404 error on some of the links on this page, check THIS list of pages that he recently moved.  Also please let me know what isn’t working on my page here so that I can go in and fix them.

Why Do We Love Our PC800s?

This question gets asked with some frequency.  Each of us has our own, special reason for loving the PC800 from the stylish, futuristic looks to the trunk that can easily hold two cases of beer plus ice.  As I run across answers to this question and answers to why people are seeking out PC800s with increasing frequency, I will post them in this section.

General Info Websites

Manuals and Parts Lists

Miscellaneous Links

  • Honda Pacific Coast Commercial: One of the original PC800 commercials that Honda produced for the bike’s release.
  • Estimating Long Motorcycle Trip Expenses: A good little write-up to get you thinking about the costs involved with doing long-distance motorcycle touring.
  • T-shirts, Buttons, Posters, and Other PC800-Related Kitsch
    • Autumn Riders: Embroidered shirts, hats, and t-shirts with PC800 themes.
    • High Tech Tees: A PC800 member has a t-shirt business and produces some nice-looking PC800 shirts.
  • PC800 Engine Dynojet: A nice graphic to show you where the power curves on the PC’s engine are.  Remember: Your power starts at 3000 RPM and ends around 7000 RPM.
  • What RPM to Shift at: There are a range of opinions on when to shift between gears.
  • Loud Pipes on a PC800: One IPCRCer who is a member of a local ABATE chapter figured out how to keep up with the Harley riders and their loud pipes.
  • Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man: This movie had a PC800 make an appearance.  It was slightly modified to be a “futuristic” cop bike.  This link shows the relevant clip.  I hear that the rest of the movie isn’t that great.
  • Original OEM Optional Parts: There were a number of original parts that could be bought from Honda to dress up the PC800.  None are available from Honda anymore but alternative sources for some exist.
  • Lemmings Non Sumus: The legendary patch is back in a limited run (as of Oct 22nd, 2010).  Get it before it’s gone!
  • How to Make Your Own Seafoam: A recipe to brew your own if you can’t find any in your town.  Seafoam is great for cleaning out carbs.  Add some to your gas tank and magic will happen!

Gear that I Use, Like, or Have Modified and Companies I Like

  • Helmet Soundproofing: This didn’t end up working as well as just getting a taller windshield.  Although it has helped me get some really funny looks at gas stations and on the highway.
  • Super Visor: A superb product that helps keep the sun out of my eyes and off my face.
  • Warm n Safe: I personally bought a dual permanent mount heat troller, some various wires, connectors and plugs, and heated socks from this company.  The people are very nice, the product is good, and I haven’t had any problems with the gear yet.
  • Gerbing: I bought a pair of heated riding gloves from this company.  The product has worked well enough.  I wish though that someone, somewhere would make a glove with long enough thumbs for me.
  • Motorcycle Gear: This is pretty much the only place that I will buy riding gear from.  Everything I’ve purchased from them has been exactly what I expected and the prices are very hard to beat. (Formerly NewEnough.com. Same great people, same great service, just a new name to reflect what they really do today.)

General Information About the PC800

  • Usable Standard Fuel Tank Capacity: 4.2 gallons according to a member who had to push his bike into a gas station.  Search on this page for info on people who modified their bikes to hold much more gas.
  • Decoding Your VIN Number: A handy guide to figure out just when your bike was made and where it was destined for.
  • Trouble Finding Neutral: It isn’t just you.  When the PC800 is warm or running above idle, it is difficult for some to find neutral.  Me included.
  • PC800 Patent: One of the original patents that covers the PC800’s radical departure from conventional motorcycle design.

Modifications/Additions/Farkles

PC800 Rat Rods

  • The Nekkid PC: I bought the Nekkid PC after the previous owner removed its plastics and ratted it out.  Later on, I sold it to my buddy Drew who transformed the bike into something of beauty. Just look at how amazing it looks now!
  • Frankenbike: This PC lives somewhere back east.  I heard it was for sale a while ago.  It appears that it has the front end off of a sport bike and a few other significant modifications.
  • Cack: The most famous PC800 on the planet ridden by Vermin, his kids, and other maniacs.  The level of maintenance negligence that Vermin achieves just goes to show how resilient and robust the PC really is.

Electrical System

  • Battery Cutoff Switch Mod: A how-to for installing a marine-grade battery disconnect switch.
  • Heat Troller Installation: Text describing how a heat troller was installed with a few photos.
  • Regulator/Rectifier Purchase: Where a new high quality R/R can be bought.
  • Regulator/Rectifier Position Relocation: Salty Dog relocated the R/R on his PC800 to be further away from the heat-generating engine.
  • Off-brand Regulator/Rectifier: Turns out that the R/R in these photos is from a different bike.  It worked on mine but I decided to go back to an R/R designed for the PC800.
  • Cooling Your Regulator/Rectifier: Several options have been tried by IPCRCers.  They include relocating the R/R to a position on the rear trunk, coating the R/R with heat sink compound where it connects to the frame, adding additional cooling fins to the R/R, and using a small fan to cool the R/R (this didn’t work.  I don’t have the link to the thread discussing this at the moment.  If someone does, please contact me!).
  • Cigarette Lighter: How to install a cigarette lighter in the left glove box.
  • Battery Tender Harness: Photos and text about installing a Battery Tender Jr harness.
  • Auxiliary Fuse Block Install: A how-to for installing an auxiliary fuse block.
  • Voltage Meters: Two different voltage meters on the PC to keep the electrical charging system under close scrutiny.
  • Driving Lights: Even with the weak electrical system of the PC800, many people have added driving lights for better nighttime visibility.
    • Super Bright LEDS dot Com Driving Lights: Scott sent me a link with a great writeup of some new LED driving lights that he installed.  I’m considering getting some for my bike.
    • Vision-X Solstice Spot 10: A small 10 watt LED bulb can produce a heck of a lot of light.  There are several different beam widths and color choices.  Many places sell them as “boat lights.”
    • Magicshine 900: Another LED lamp usually used for mountain biking.  I use one on my mountain bike and have been contemplating adapting it for the PC.  The price is right.  The wiring (internal stuff on a circuit board) looks like it might be tricky.
    • Many, many other options exist.  Please send me information on any that you know about that work well with the PC!
  • Horns: Lots of options exist to upgrade the puny stock horn on the PC800.
    • Stebel Nautilus Compact Air Horn: This horn is SUPER LOUD.  I installed one and I can attest to it working wonderfully.  Look in the Files section of the IPCRC for “Stebel Compact Install.pdf”
    • Honda Low-tone Horn: A low-tone horn exists that can be bought as an OEM part (38120-MR5-661) to compliment the high-tone horn included on the PC.  Note that some international versions (European) of the PC already have the low tone installed while the US version does not.  One IPCRC’er from New Zealand found a Honda low tone horn to fit in the blank horn spot on his PC at an auto breaker.
    • Hella TE16 Dual Horns: Small enough to potentially fit in the stock horn location on the PC.  An IPCRC member is investigating this.
    • WOLO Brand Air Horn: Dean from the IPCRC list has had these air horns installed on his PC since 2001 and loves them.
    • FIAMM El Grande Air Horn: Some people  from the IPCRC have installed these compact air horns on their bikes with good results.
    • Dual Air Horns: an IPCRCer installed dual air horns behind the fairing next to the mirrors on his PC.  It must produce quite the racket when he sounds his horn.
  • Garage Door Opener: An IPCRCer hacked a garage door opener into his handle bars.
  • Batteries: What battery you put in your PC might matter.
    • AMG Battery: It goes under other names such as Big Crank.  Some PC owners use this battery.  Don’t know how long it will last.
    • Yuasa Battery: I believe this was the original OEM battery for the PC.  They are supposed to last a long, long time if taken care of properly.  Someday when my battery dies, I will probably buy one of these.
    • Ever Start Battery: WalMart carries this one.  I have heard of a few people using it but don’t know about the reliability.
    • REMEMBER!!! Use a battery tender if you want your battery to live longer.  That’s my experience, anyway.
    • REMEMBER!!! It’s a bad idea to have a lead acid battery in your PC.  Find a sealed gel battery.
    • Gel Batteries: Some people report extremely long lifespans for their gel batteries.
    • WalMart Battery: One IPCRCer got about three or four years out of his WalMart battery.
    • Shorai Lithium Iron Battery: This battery might not be a very good choice.  One IPCRCer had bad luck with it.
  • Headlights: There are a couple of options for headlight bulbs on the PC.  It seems that people are split between using the stock bulb and using a higher-powered bulb.  The higher-powered options need a custom harness so that enough power can be sent to the bulb without burning out the PC’s wiring.
    • Sylvania Bulb: This bulb is supposed to greatly increase your peripheral vision at night.
    • High Output Headlight Harness: This might get a few extra lumens out of your existing headlight bulb.  You also need it if you are going to install a higher wattage bulb.  There’s another high-output harness available as well.
    • Higher Spec, Same Wattage Bulb: If you can find one, it might be a better idea to go with a higher spec bulb than bumping up the wattage.  It’s possible that you’ll melt the plastic light housing and lens or burn out wiring if you put too much wattage into the headlight.
    • HID Light: It will be much brighter!  But it could melt some plastic and might strain your electrical system.
    • HID Light Redux: More people are installing HID lights with drop-in bulbs.
    • HID Light Installation: I installed an HID light on my bike.  It is a drop-in replacement.  Someday I will put in a full projector housing but for now this is pretty darn good.
    • How-To Replace your Headlight Bulb: This is a good video showing how to change your PC800 headlight.
    • Ting’s HID Installation: Ting did a nice job installing an HID setup on his PC800.
    • HID Projection Light and Angel Eyes: Salty Dog did an amazing HID projection light and angel eye conversion.
    • HID Ballast Interference: One IPCRCer discovered that his HID ballast is causing interference on the CB radio bands.  He found more information online that indicates there are problems on other radio frequency bands as well.
  • Trunk Light: Without a light, our trunks can be dark, cavernous holes.
    • OEM Trunk Light: Honda made a trunk light that was wired to a switch.  They aren’t available anymore although once in a while you’ll see one floating around.  Some people had trouble with the switches dyeing which would result in the battery being drained.
    • Stick-On Lights: Many people have put stick-on lights that can be bought at just about any home improvement store into their trunks.  They are battery-powered and need only be pressed to turn on.
    • OEM Light with Custom Switch: One IPCRCer used the OEM lights for the trunk with a mercury switch to regulate when they turn on and off.
  • Brake Lights, Turn Signals, Running Lights, and Meter/Instrument Lights
    • Tail Light Running Light Modification: To get more rear visibility at night, you can do a mod to turn the turn signals into running lights.  The kit comes from Electrical Connections.
    • LED Light Bar: Some IPCRC people have really been enjoying this particular light bar addition.
    • LED Turn Signals and Brake Lights: This is something I’ve been considering for a while.  Several people have done a partial or full LED conversion.  Remember that you need to figure out how to either remove the self-canceling turn signal module from the loop or you will have to add resistors so that it still sees the same load.  Otherwise I can tell you from personal experience that the module will burn out.  And it is expensive to replace!  I will compile a better list of resources for this eventually.  Until then this, this, this, and this might be useful.
    • LED Instrument Cluster: An IPCRC member converted his dash from incandescent bulbs to LED bulbs.  The results are very nice.  He also achieved a significant power savings.
    • Running Lights Galore: One PCer added a series of LED strips all around his bike to make it really stand out at night.  Someday my bike might look like this!
    • Full LED Conversion Analysis: I put together a full analysis of what could be saved and how much it would cost by converting to LED for all of the incandescent lights on the bike (except the headlight).  This is for drop-in replacement bulbs.
    • Full LED Conversion Complete: I did a full LED conversion on my bike.  It works very well.  I am happy with the results.
    • Complete Custom LED Conversion: The Kevin Quosig LED conversion project appears to have been quite the feat.  He started with converting his Uni-Go trailer to using LED arrays sourced from Custom Dynamics.  The steps to his Uni-Go conversion are here: Step 1Step 2Step 3Step 3.5end results of the Uni-Go conversion.  The steps to his PC conversion are here:Step 1Step 2Step 3Step 4Step 5end results of the PC800 conversion.  The total cost of the entire conversion was approximately $1000.  Yes, one thousand dollars.  Kevin thinks it was worth it though.  I would suspect with the reduction in price of high quality, high output LEDs since 2004, this project could be done much more inexpensively today.  Especially if you were to build your own array boards.
    • Turn Signal Control Module: Photos of the guts of the turn signal control module are available.  The unit is located at the bottom of the steering stem on bikes that are equipped with self-cancel turn signal units.
    • DIY LED-Compatible Flasher Relay Unit: I built my own flasher relay after I found that the stock unit on the PC800 will not work with LED bulbs unless you add resistors.
    • Automotive Turn Signal Flasher: This unit can be placed in the PC800’s wiring easily and without headache.  It is also compatible with LED bulbs.
    • Bypass the Turn Signal Control Module: Seth and I came up with two different designs that will bypass your self-cancel control module.  This will be of interest for people who had their module fail or who don’t want self-canceling turn signals.
    • LED Brake Lights: One IPCRCer installed some nice LED bulbs in his tail lights.
    • Wong Wing LED Lights: Salty Dog installed LED lights in his Wong Wing.  If the link doesn’t work, search on the IPCRC’s photo database for “Salty Dogs PC800″ photo album.
    • LED Conversion: Another IPCRCer did a great job of converting his PC to run with LEDs.  He kept all of the stock electrical components but added load balancing resistors to the turn signal wires.
    • LED Flashing Brake Lights: One IPCRCer installed flashing LED bulbs.  It is the same effect as a “Back-Off” module but without the need for the extra wiring.
  • Poorman’s Engine Kill Switch: One enterprising PCer used a cheap readily available RadioShack rocker switch in place of Mother Honda’s OEM engine kill switch.  He had some difficulties at first but it works now.  Most PCers will probably want to go with OEM but if you’re feeling adventurous, give this a try!
  • Fan Bypass Switch: One PCer installed a bypass switch so the radiator fan can be turned on manually in case of temperature sensor failure or other thermal problems.
  • Radios: People have been getting creative now that the OEM Hondaline radio isn’t available anymore
    • Hondaline OEM Radio: If you can find one, it will cost you a pretty penny and take up tons of room in your trunk.  My bike used to have one on it but one of the previous owners removed it in favor of more trunk space.
    • Speaker Grilles: If your bike didn’t come with built-in speaker grilles, you can make your own.  You can also buy pre-made grilles.
    • Shark Radio: An IPCRCer mounted one of these radios on his PC.  It worked for a while but eventually failed.  Another IPCRCer tried a different model of Shark and didn’t like it.  The IPCRCer who had the Shark Radio fail later was able to resurrect it and is happy once again.
    • Polk Marine Speakers: One IPCRCer used Polk Marine Speakers to good effect with a DWG system.
    • Do you have anything I should add to this category?  Shoot me a note and I’ll put the info in here!
  • Disable Parking Lights: If you’ve drained your battery by leaving your bike’s ignition in “Park” rather than “Off” or “Lock,” this is the cheapest most simple fix.  Personally I’ve left my park fuse in and instead have a battery cutoff switch installed.

Windshield

  • Clearview: It seems most PC owners think that Clearview produces the best aftermarket windshield.  I recently upgraded to a +5 on my bike after having a +3 for about 5000 miles.  Upgrading to the taller windshield helped to reduce wind buffeting on my helmet (I’m 6’3″).  If you’re under 6’2″ you can probably be fine with a +3.  The Goldwing-style vent is good for hot summer riding.  My new windshield has one and I like it.  Just be mindful of the occasional bee.
  • Rifle: Some PC owners use this windshield.  I have been told it is cheaper and less sturdy than the Clearview.
  • Laminar Lip: You can add one of these to an existing windshield to have adjustable height.  The one you can order from their website only fits stock windshields but they also have a version for Clearview windshields.  Call them on the phone if you want the model for your Clearview.
  • Saeng Micro-Swirl: One IPCRCer really liked this product to add to a windshield although many people on ADVRider don’t like this product and prefer to use a Laminar Lip.
  • MRA VarioScreen: An IPCRCer used a product similar to the Laminar Lip to get some additional life out of his stock windshield.  At under $100 for the whole setup, it will buy time for tall people before you have to fork over the cash for a Clearview windshield.  Here are his instructions for installing the MRA VarioScreen.  Here is another PC’ers experience with the VarioScreen.  He REALLY likes it.
  • DIY Windshield Extension: One IPCRCer made his own home-brew Laminar Lip.  I think I might have to do this myself soon.
  • DIY Windshield Extension — non-permanent: This is a great how-to for building your own windshield extension courtesy of the Burgman forums.
  • Goldwing Windshield: Don’t know much about this option but I’ve heard one or two people say that they’ve converted a Goldwing windshield for use on a PC.  Try asking on the IPCRC for more details.
  • Windscreen Spoiler: Someone mentioned this product to help with buffeting problems.  I’m not sure if anyone has actually used it on a PC or not.
  • 7JuRock: Another windshield manufacturer that makes aftermarket PC windshields.  I don’t know if anyone is riding with a shield from this company or not.
  • Cee Baileys: Another company that makes PC800 windshields.  I don’t know much about this company but obviously someone must buy shields from them.
  • How-To Reinstall a Windshield: An outstanding writeup of how to reinstall your windshield.
  • How-To Remove a Windshield: A good video of how to remove a windshield from a PC800.
  • Electrically-Adjustable Windshield: I’m thinking about building an electrically-adjustable windshield for the PC800.
  • Sno-Stuff Snowmobile Windshield: One IPCRCer found a PC800 that had a Sno-Stuff snowmobile windshield grafted to the bike.  It looks pretty good!

Handlebars

  • Bar Risers: There is a company who makes bar risers specifically for the PC.   I installed them on my bike and absolutely love them.
  • Grip Puppies: A sure-fire way to make the small grips on the PC suddenly feel normal sized again.  They slip on over your existing grips and are easily removable.
  • Sunline Grand Tour Grips: An after market grip that many IPCRCers like.
  • Kuryakyn ISO Grips: Some IPCRCers really like this style of grip.
  • Cruise Controls and Throttle Locks: There are several options for relieving that right wrist pain.
    • Audiovox CCS 100 Cruise Control: A guide on how to setup the Audiovox CCS 100 cruise control on the PC.  Lots of people have these.  I plan to do this at some point when money and time permit.
    • Vista Cruise Throttle Lock: Many people have these installed including me.  They lock the throttle in one position for very constant road grades and momentary cramp relief.  I also use mine to help reduce fatigue in more varied terrain.  There is some good info here about installing them.
    • Home-made Cruise Control: One IPCRCer built his own free cruise control system.

Rear Racks, Top Boxes, and Other Luggage

  • Athena’s Trunk Bags: The BEST bags one can find for our PC trunks.  I’m not the only one that thinks this, either.  It sounds like she has stopped production.  Can’t hurt to contact her though.
  • Sears Brand Motorcycle Top Case: A bunch of people on the IPCRC have lately been picking up the large version of this trunk.  For about $60 shipped you can get a decent quality top case to mount on any existing rear rack.  If you are logged into your Yahoo account and are a member of the IPCRC, check out how one IPCRC member painted his top case.
  • SHAD Motorcycle Top Case: Some IPCRCers like this case.
  • EBay Top Case: One IPCRCer really likes the top case he purchased from EBay.
  • Another EBay Top Case: An IPCRCer found a nice top box on EBay.
  • Rear Racks: There isn’t anyone commercially producing a rear rack for the PC at the moment but some people are working on home-brewed setups.
    • Givi SR-10: Givi used to produce a rear rack for the PC that interfaced with Givi luggage.  The main complaint people have with it (aside from it not being produced anymore!) is that it blocks use of the passenger seat grips.  This can make it hard to put the bike on the center stand and takes away the hand holds from your passenger.  If you see one for sale on E-Bay (pretty rare), it will go for more than $200.  In case you happen to have one, here are instructionsfor mounting the SR-10 to a PC. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
      • Givi SR-10 Group Buy: Jeff on the IPCRC is trying to coordinate a group buy with Givi to get the SR-10 back into production.  It requires 100 people to sign up for a rack to make the deal happen.  Talk to Jeff for more details.
    • Givi F1000 Universal Rack: Yes, this rack fits! Some are currently using it with good success.  It isn’t as nice as the purpose-built Givi rack that is no longer in production but it will work.  In spite of what Givi says, it does fit.  And it’s available.
    • Reid Rack: An IPCRC member used to make “Reid Racks” that attach to the optional Hondaline passenger backrest.  It seems he is no longer in the rear rack business.  Very rarely you might see one of these for sale.  Some people think that this design isn’t very safe for large loads because it is cantilevered off of the passenger backrest.  However, it does keep the passenger hand holds free. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
    • Bent Sheet Metal Rear Rack: Don’t have too much information on this one other than that the person who owns it bought it from someone on E-Bay who had made it as a one-off for his bike.  I am told that it is made out of sheet metal and is quite substantial. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
    • Nonfango Rear Rack: Every once in a great while I will see one of these racks on E-Bay.  Some people use them but I don’t have much information on them.  They look an awful lot like the Givi SR-10 rack. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
    • Dan Birell Rack: No longer in production as far as the IPCRC can tell.  One every once in a great while comes up for sale somewhere.
    • Landsberger Rack: Like the Reid Rack but made of epoxy coated steel.  One or two might be floating around for sale.  It is too small for a top case but big enough to bungee some gear onto.
    • Mike’s Home-Made Rack: A home-made rack that turned out pretty well.  It holds a GIVI top case.  Photos of it are available here.
    • Ting’s Home-Made Pipe Rack: This home-made rack can be made for about $22 and one trip to your local Home Depot.  Not too shabby!
    • Brian’s Home-Made Rack: This rack is made with some pieces from Home Depot and a plastic cutting board.  It looks like it should serve the owner very well.
    • A Ukrainian Rack: There is a company in Ukraine (Mmoto Parts) that makes racks for the PC.  This was originally discussed on the UK PC800 forums.  Since then, an IPCRCer has purchased one and been very pleased with the results.  The manufacturer is even sending him a slightly modified rack after the first rack wasn’t quite what he was looking for.  There are actually two models offered from the company.  One requires some drilling of the trunk plastics.  One IPCRCer who purchased a Ukranian rack really loves his setup and it looks great, too!  For ~$200, you really can’t beat this deal.
  • Bicycle Carrier: One IPCRC member made a pretty cool bicycle rack for their PC.  It mounts onto a rear rack. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
  • Bike Rack: A company makes purpose-built bike racks.  Also golf club/bag racks.  Considering all of the outlandish things us PCers haul on our bikes, this might come in handy for a few people.
  • Tank Bags and Glove Boxes: Several options exist for putting a bag on the tank or between the handle bars.
    • Glovebox/Handlebar Bag: An enterprising IPCRC member created a do-it-yourself glovebox kit.  I believe it is no longer produced but sometimes they come up used.  This post on the IPCRC has more information. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
    • Glovebox/Handlebar Bag REDUX: Athena of Athena’s Trunkbags fame is considering reproducing the handlebar/tank bags of old for the PC800 community.
    • RKA Luggage Tank Bag: One IPCRCer has had very good luck using the IN-Charge series of tank bags on his PC.
    • Bagster Tank Bag: Another IPCRCer loves the Bagster brand tank bag enough to have one for each of his PCs.
    • Joe Rocket Mantra Tank Bag: Yet another IPCRCer has been using a Mantra tank bag for quite some time with very good results.
    • Magnetic tank bags: Someone put magnetic material on the underside of his top shelter so that he could have a magnetic tank bag.  It sounds like it works pretty well!
    • Bicycle Bag Conversion: Re-purposing other things for PC purposes.  Seems to work well for this PCer.
    • Magnets for Magnetic Tank Bags: Yet another PC owner who glued magnets under his faux gas tank cover.
  • Givi Top Case Brake Light Instructions: Some instructions and photos of how to mount lights into your Givi box with PC-specific information for wiring the top box into your brake light system. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the link.)
  • RKA Passenger Seat Luggage: One IPCRCer loves his RKA passenger seat luggage.  It’s big enough to hold a full face helmet but still is unobtrusive.
  • Bikers Friend Bags: At least one ’96 PC800 sports a bag from this company.  It looks like it would work well on the PC as a driver backrest when no passenger is being carried.  Might be a bit of a challenge though to throw your leg over it.
  • PVC Rack: One IPCRCer made a rack out of PVC pipe.  Looks like it works pretty well!
  • LEDs on a Givi Top Box and How to Install a Givi Case: An IPCRCer who is also an inmate of ADVRider put a nice AdMore LED light kit on a Givi E52 top case.  The write-up is most excellent.

Trailer Hitches

  • Home-Made Hitch: One IPCRCer (Tony) recently made his own hitch.  Contact him either at the previous link or directly at to@cascadeclaims.com to get more details.  From a recent (May 2011) email conversation with Tony, the shop is lined up to make more once he has enough people committed to purchasing hitches.  In my opinion, the price he has set is very reasonable.
  • Uni-Go Trailer Hitch: A fellow PC-er named Dale informs me that as of 17 August 2013, Uni-Go is producing PC800 hitches again.  It turns out that Uni-Go still has the jig for the PC800.  If it isn’t listed on their website, give Uni-Go a call.  That’s what Dale did and he got production restarted.  It will take 3-4 weeks for his hitch to be produced and will cost him around $450.  It’s worth a look!
  • Do you have more info on hitch options?  Then please send it to me!

Tires and Accessories

  • All the Tire Info You Will Ever Need: Every PC owner has their own preference for tires.  Hopefully some of these links will help you decide.
    • Tire Size: The linked post has the tire size info that you’ll need in your quest for tires.
    • Tire Info for Dunlop and Metzeler: If the link doesn’t work, go to the “Files” section of the IPCRC site and search for “Tire Information.”
    • Dunlop: The original stock tires for the PC.  Some people complain of poor handling on grooved pavement and general crack-following.  Other people really love this tire.  Note that it appears Dunlop shifted production of the tire to Indonesia which has resulted in a dramatic mileage decrease for some PC800 riders.
    • Metzeler: The other main-stream option for the PC.  Many people think this tire handles better on grooved pavement.  Some people say that the tires “chirp” when cornering.  This is the brand I use on my PC simply because that’s what was on the bike when I bought it.  Occasionally Metzeler tires experience “chunking” issues.  I had a rear tire begin to do this to me before I replaced it.  More severe cases such as this do occur from time to time as the tires pass the 20k mile mark.
    • The Dark Side: Car and other non-motorcycle-specific tires.  Note that there is a real debate amongst the PC community over if car tires are a good idea or not.
      • Bridgestone and Kenda: Two different tires that look the same and fit on the rear.  One person uses a Bridgestone Battleaxe mounted reversed on the front, too.  Another has been using a Kenda with good luck.
      • Shinko Tire: This company makes a rear tire that some IPCRCers are running with good success.  8k miles per rear tire is currently being reported.  They even fit the ’89 trunks.
      • Michelin Anakee Tires:  One or two people have used these tires although they are reported to have cupping problems after 4-8k miles.
      • Mixing Tires: Some people run different types of tires front and rear.
      • IRC Wild Flare: One person installed one of these on the front with good results after 1800 miles.  Another person had bad cupping on the same tire after 6000 miles.
      • Dark Side for a Day: I got the chance to try out a PC800 equipped with a BF Goodrich Radial car tire on the rear and a Battlax tire on the front recently.  This is my opinion of the ride.
      • Full Bore Tires: One IPCRCer is experimenting with these tires to good results.  This is the end result.  The IPCRCer found them to not produce as many miles as he had hoped but otherwise was pleased.
    • Avon Universal Tire: An option for the front tire.  One IPCRCer reports good luck with them.  So does another.
    • Michelin Commander II: A new tire choice for 1990 and later PC800s.  The trunk liner on 89 PCs will rub with this rear tire.
    • Avon Roadrider AM26: These tires appear to last very long but reviews are mixed.
  • Avon Venom AM42 Rear Tire: One IPCRCer is replacing his rear tire with this tire.
  • Tire Age Codes: Important stuff to check to make sure you don’t end up sliding down the highway due to old rubber.
  • Air Compressor: I installed a permanently mounted (I hope!) air compressor on my PC to pump up tires on the go.  Hopefully I never ever have to use it.
  • Tire Balancing: If you feel like doing your own tire balancing, there are a couple of options that IPCRCers use.
    • Dyna Beads: These and very similar products also go by other names.  Some people get creative and use airsoft BBs.  Basically, you put a bunch of very small beads in your tire.  The beads automatically balance the tire as you ride.  Some people have problems with the beads clumping.  However, there are ways around the clumping issue.  They are also difficult to get into the tire.   The benefit is that you don’t have to balance your tire.  Also the tire will always be balanced as it wears.  Some report though that if you go over about 70 mph, the tires won’t balance properly anymore.
    • How to Balance Your Own Tires: A fellow IPCRCer recommended this link to learn a little bit about balancing my own tires.  Other IPCRCers also chimed in with good advice.  And more good advice.
    • Stick-On Lead: The conventional way to balance your tires is to use stick-on lead.  The local independent shop near me uses that method as do many IPCRCers.
    • Using BBs, Plastic Balls, etc: A good discussion on what type of spherical objects to use in your tires if you are balancing yourself.
  • Aluminum Valve Stems: Several IPCRCers recommend getting aluminum valve stems for peace-of-mind.  At the least, you should carry a few spare stems with you on long trips lest you end up waiting for one lousy little part for four or five days.  In case that link stops working, P/N 11970-N produced by ARIETE should fit the PC800.  Other people use stock valve stems.  Just make sure you change them every few tire replacements.  An IPCRCer recently changed over to these stems.
  • Kurvey Girl Valve Stems: Another valve stem option that some IPCRCers like.
  • Nitrogen vs Air: Some people use it in some vehicles.  Some people like it.  Some people don’t.  Lots of good information here.

Brakes and Clutch

  • Braided Steel Clutch and Brake Lines
    • Brake and Clutch Steel Lines: An IPCRC member got a company in Canada to start producing steel braided lines for most PCs.  I believe the 94-95 PCs still aren’t covered but eventually they will have lines available too.  The price is quite reasonable.
    • Spiegler Stainless Steel Lines: Another company that makes brake lines out of braided stainless steel.  They have 90-98 PCs covered.  It should also work for the ’89.  It’s an expensive option compared to others though.  IPCRCer Seth really liked the results and customer service of Spiegler.
    • Paragon Performance Steel Lines: Yet another company that makes or made at some point in time braided stainless steel lines.
    • Galfer USA: Another company that does stainless steel lines for the PC.
    • Steel Lines Installed: A photo gallery of a 1990 PC800 (“MrT”) with steel brake lines installed.
    • G&J Steel Brake and Clutch Lines: Another source for good stainless steel brake and clutch lines.  Note that G&J is in California, not Canada. (Thanks Chris for pointing that out!)
    • Local Hose Supply Companies: A good option for those willing to put in a few phone calls is to get a local hose supply company to make up the parts for you.  For instance, Fluid Connector Products Inc is located within an hour of where I live and can make up the hoses while I wait for roughly $25-$30/hose.  It took me about a half dozen calls before I found a company that could do it.  Performance auto mechanics can often make up the hoses you need, too.
    • Installing Braided Steel Lines: This is how I installed mine.  Note that I still need to add some padding on the lines to make sure they don’t get cut through by rubbing.
  • Rear Brake Petal Adjustment: Here is a way to adjust when your rear brake petal engages your brake lights.
  • Galfer Wave Rotors: At least one company appears to make after market rotors for the PC800.  If your rotors are thinner than 4mm, it’s time to put some new ones on.  Here is a brief report of someone who has been running the wave rotors and loves them.
  • Adjustable Brake and Clutch Levers: There are a few products available on EBay that allow for the brake and clutch lever swing to be changed for those with short or long fingers.
  • ST1100 Front Brake Rotors: The PC800 can take ST1100 front brake rotors if you take the plastic disk covers off (for the ’89-’96 models) and use ST1100 brake hangers.  This will theoretically give you more stopping power.
  • Race Tech Gold Valve Modification: One IPCRCer did a valve mod on his brakes to separate compression and rebound circuits.
  • Suzuki GSX 600 Brake Master Cylinder: One IPCRCer swapped in a Suzuki GSX 600 master cylinder to provide more stopping power.

Fuel System

  • Fuel Gauge Accuracy
    • 12-Step Guide to More Accurate Empty Readings: One method of changing the position of the fuel float for better accuracy.
    • 330 ohm resistor fix: UPDATED A how-to to add a 330 ohm resistor into the fuel gauge electrical circuit.  No modification of the float necessary!  The original version is available here in Dutch.  Thanks to Alfred for putting together both the Dutch and English-language versions.  Look in the comments of this page for more info from Alfred.  When I get the time, I’m going to implement this modification on my PC800.
    • Quick Guide to Float Adjustment: A short guide on how to adjust the fuel float.
    • Three Fuel Gauge Fixes: There are three basic methods to fix your fuel gauge.  Choose whichever you prefer.
  • 7.7 Gallon Gas Tank: One intrepid IPCRCer modified his top shelter to add extra gas storage.  He now can store 7.7 gallons rather than the stock storage capacity.
  • Fuel Injection for the PC800: I am starting to work on converting my PC800 to have fuel injection.  This is very much a WORK IN PROGRESS.
  • Carrying Extra Fuel: One IPCRCer found an interesting site with a system to strap gas cans to your passenger pegs.

Seats and Backrests

  • Seat Opinions: This is a recent thread on the IPCRC with people chiming in with their seat preferences.  Personally, I ride with a stock seat and it’s been fine for me on 1000+ mile rides.
  • After Market Seats:
    • Corbin: Some people swear by these after market seats.  Others find them uncomfortable.  It’s entirely up to your butt’s preference.
    • Rick Mayer Custom Seats: The people who have these seats love them.  However, some have had bad customer service and slow orders.  If you go this route, buy a spare seat on E-Bay to use for the few months your seat is away being re-finished.
    • Mr Ed’s Moto: A business that’s only 15 miles from where I live that does an excellent job with custom seats.  If you happen to be in the area, he can usually have your seat turned around in a day if you come to his shop with your bike and hang out until it’s done.  This also allows you to test sit on it as he builds it up.
    • Great Day to Ride: An IPCRCer recommends this company to refinish seats.
  • Butt-Savers
    • Butt Buffer: Some IPCRC members think this is the only way to keep your butt happy on long rides.  Search the IPCRC list or post a message to get details on proper sizing.
    • Air Hawk: At least one IPCRC member uses this cushion and loves it.
    • Longeride: Good things have been said about this cushion system.  I don’t know much about it though.
    • Hunter Bunsaver: A cheap alternative for a cushioned ride.  Well, as long as you don’t mind cammo.
    • Toilet Lid Cover:  Using a toilet lid cover has worked very well for one IPCRC member.  I’ve been thinking about trying this option out.
    • Beaded Seat Cover: One IPCRC member absolutely swears by using a beaded seat cover on his bike.   He reports that it has worked great on his girlfriend’s V-Strom, too.
    • REI Cushion: For $30, this is a pretty good deal.  One or two IPCRCers use it with good success.
  • Other Ways of Saving Your Butt
    • A Close Shave: Some members of the IPCRC shave or trim their hair in certain key regions to eliminate butt burn.
    • Cycling Shorts:  Many people (me included) wear cycling shorts under our riding gear to cut down on chafing and give a little extra cushion.
    • Commando: A few suggest going commando to relieve some of the problems of undergarments.
  • Back Rests
    • Hondaline OEM Backrest: Honda made an OEM passenger backrest for the PC800.  They come up for sale on a semi-regular basis on E-Bay.  My passengers love my Hondaline backrest.  they say it makes the PC800 passenger seat feel even more like a throne.  Also it appears that there might be a new OEM part number for the backrests and that they are in production again.
    • After market Backrest: Apparently an IPCRC member used to make backrests.  I don’t have anymore info on this.
    • Utopia Products Driver and Passenger Backrests: If your back hurts when you ride, your passenger wants a taller backrest, or you need to lash some luggage on the rear pylon, the Utopia solution might be what you need.  One IPCRCer loved his old one. Other IPCRCers report that passengers like them.
    • Back-A-Line: Not a back rest but a back support you wear on your body.  Some people have good luck with these.
    • Badger Cycle Backrest: This company sells a backrest for the PC800.  (Link goes to the IPCRC where there are more details)
  • After market Seat Covers: If you need to re-cover your seat, at least one company makes a cover for the PC.  Specialty custom seat shops can do it, too.

Highway Pegs

  • Mick-O-Pegs: These are the pegs that I ride with.  I absolutely love them.  These are NOT like normal highway pegs.  I find the position very comfortable.  Others worry about them becoming the new low point to grind upon when doing sharp cornering.  This is my write-up of my Mick-O-Pegs installation.  Scott made a great video to show how to install them as well.
  • Traditional Pegs: These are bolted to the crash bars and stick out like normal highway pegs.  Were you to drop your bike, these pegs would be the first thing to contact.
  • Highway Boards: A PCer came up with an interesting concept of using the passenger foot pegs as highway pegs.  It looks pretty slick.
  • Floorboards: Another PCer developed floorboards for his PC from Goldwing floorboards.
  • Valkyrie Pegs: You can gain an extra half inch on the stock pegs in the stock peg position by buying a set of Valkyrie pegs and replacing the OEM pegs.
  • Kuryakyn Highway Peg Setup: One IPCRCer figured out how to setup some Kuryakyn pegs on his PC.

Suspension, Steering, and Front End Stuff

  • Tapered Roller Bearings: A great upgrade for your PC is a set of tapered roller bearings.  All-Balls makes the bearing that most people use.  This post, this post, this post, and this post from the IPCRC should get you pointed in the correct direction to do the job.
  • Progressive Fork Springs: This will make your ride much more comfortable and more responsive.  Do a Google search for these springs.  They’re pretty easy to find.  People absolutely LOVE them.
  • Custom Fork Springs: My bike came from the PO with some strange custom fork springs.  There are two separate springs sitting on top of one another inside the forks.  No one else on the IPCRC had ever seen this specific configuration before.  It has worked for thousands of miles for me so I’m not going to mess with it.
  • After Market Rear Shocks: Progressive and Works both make shocks that will fit the rear of our PCs.
  • St1100 Front End: Someone hacked a ST1100 front end onto a PC.  The trade brought updated front suspension and a larger tire to the PC.  Don’t know much else about this mod but it sounds pretty cool.
  • Front Fender Modification: For a while Dan Birrell made custom kits to mount non-stock front fenders on the PC.  A few are still floating around.  The intrepid do-it-yourself-er could probably fab up something like this in relatively short order.
  • Partial ST100 Front End: Someone is putting the lower bits of an ST1100 fork and the ST1100 fender (also maybe the wheel) onto a PC.
  • Wheel Bearings: It’s best to get OEM bearings when yours start to get crunchy.  With proper care and grease feeding, OEM bearings should last many, many miles.
  • Fork Gaiters: If you want to protect your forks from rocks and such, there are fork gaiters available that will fit on our forks.
  • Fenda Extenda: A great addition to any PC.  This piece of rubber extends the fender lower so that junk and crud doesn’t get kicked up from the road into your radiator where it can lead to gradual overheating.  I have one on my bike and it does a great job.  There is also another company that produces a similar product.

Helmet Locks and Helmet Storage

Exhaust Systems and Mufflers

  • Heat Management: Some various thoughts on how to cool down the exhaust coming from the side vents that hits your legs in the summer.
    • Heat Tape Wrap: Some people think this is a good idea to wrap heat tape around the exhaust headers and some people don’t.
    • Ceramic Coating: You can try putting a ceramic coating on your pipes for some heat relief.
    • Results of Insulating the Pipes: One IPCRCer tried insulating his pipes.  The results were less than he had hoped for cooling but seemed to make the bike perform a bit better.

 

Misc Farkles

  • Baker Built Air Wings: Several PC riders use these air wings on their PCs to eliminate the hot air spilling onto their pants in the summer.  I’ve also heard of people using one of the airwings meant for a Goldwing to keep air from puffing up the pant legs while riding.
  • Home-Made Air Wings: One IPCRCer built his own set of air wings to keep his legs cool in the Texas heat.  The photo gallery is here.
  • Pants Puffing Eliminator: One enterprising PCer built his own method of keeping cold air from puffing up his pant legs.  It looks pretty easy.  I might have to make my own set soon!
  • Foot Fairing: Another method of keeping cold air out of your pants.
  • Cold Feet No More: Yet another IPCRCer built custom air dams to keep his feet from getting cold.
  • Canyondancer II Harness: This is the preferred method of hauling a PC on or in another vehicle.  Read this thread from the IPCRC for more info on how exactly to use it.  Don’t get the Mark I.  Only buy the Mark II.  Also note that you really should make your main attachment points be the front and rear crash bars (remove the plastics on them before attaching to them).  It’s what Mother Honda wants.
  • RAM Mounts: A how-to video from Scott on how to install RAM mounts on your clutch and brake fluid reservoirs.
  • GPS RAM Mounting Guide: This is a link to an IPCRC post about how to mount a GPS on the PC800 using the same processes that Scott did in his video.
  • Home-made GPS Mount: A really nice setup that a member of the IPCRC did to mount his GPS front and center on the bike.
  • Fast and Cheap GPS Mount: An IPCRCer figured out a quick and dirty way to make a GPS mount for his bike.
  • Wong Wing: A top spoiler wing for the trunk of the PC.  These are rare to come up for sale.  If you have one mounted on your motorcycle, you can’t generally use rear racks.  But it does look pretty sharp!  It appears that only 100 Wong Wings were made in a job shop in Hong Kong.  They were improvements to the very rare Hondaline Wings.  There has been some talk of trying to get the job shop in Hong Kong to make another batch of wings. ( Note: you have to be logged into your Yahoo account and be a member of the IPCRC to see the links.)  It looks like it is moving forward slowly.
  • Lower Spoiler: A lower spoiler was available from Hondaline.  Every once in a great while one will pop up on the IPCRC or EBay.  These are very rare.
  • VT1100 Final Drive: Some people swapped in a VT1100 final drive for a while on their PCs for commuting.  It results in lower RPMs at high speeds but makes it harder to start from a dead stop.  The link at the beginning of this bullet point goes to an analysis I conducted of the differences between VT1100 final drive units that are available.  This message and this message will get you started down that path.  This message reports that after 30,000 miles and 3 years the VT1100 final drive has been performing admirably.  This message gives some more technical details and specific VT1100 year requirements plus lots of other good information and experiences.  Here is a video of one way to do the swap.  I installed a VT1100 final drive on my bike and absolutely love it.
  • VT1100 Engine Swap: A brave IPCRCer is planning to do a VT1100 engine swap.  If it’s successful, I will strongly consider doing the swap on my bike as well.
  • Six Speed Transmission: One IPCRCer is attempting to squeeze a six speed transmission off of a VT700 into the PC800’s engine.  It looks promising!
  • Flex-It Sidecar: This is one sidecar option for the PC800.  A few people really love their sidecars.  Someone is just launching into the project.
  • Trunk Mats: People over the years have made trunk mats.  A few scraps from a carpet shop should get you on your way.
  • Aftermarket CDI: It seems that the aftermarket CDI boxes that show up on E-Bay are really only useful if you have a bike from a market that restricts horsepower.  The North American bikes all seem to already have a stock de-restricted CDI.
  • Bicycle Bell: This is the PERFECT thing to put on your PC800 for those times when sport bikes or Harleys pull up next to you at a light and rev their engines.  You’ll beat them off the line because they’ll be laughing so hard.
  • Automotive Mirrors on a PC800: Have you just smashed up one of your beloved PC800 mirrors?  Do you not want to pay a LOT of money for a replacement?  You are in luck!  Mr. Packrat has a solution for you!
  • Oil Pressure Gauge Mod: Salty Dog modified his oil pressure gauge in order to watch oil pressure as well as monitor if the oil pressure runs low.
  • Dash Covers: For a time there was a company that made a whole line of covers for the PC800’s dash.  Very occasionally a bike with one installed will come up for sale.

Maintenance

Engine

  • Removing and Installing an Engine: It’s a big task but with proper planning, you can do it.
  • Cam Plugs: When your cam plugs start to leak, you have to decide if it’s worth the bother to fix them or have a “Harley drip.”
    • Tappet Trouble: I screwed up my hydraulic tappets in the process of the cam plug job.
    • Anyone Can Replace Cam Plugs: While it does take time, just about anyone who knows the difference between a screwdriver and a hammer can replace their cam plugs and save a lot of money.
    • A Mistaken Torque Value: BE SURE that you have the correct torque values before you start reassembling your engine head covers.
    • How to Replace Your Cam Plugs: This is a good post on how to replace your cam plugs.
  • Oil Leaks: Various oil leaks I and others have had and what we’ve had to do to fix the problem.
  • Missing Hoses: No, the PC isn’t missing vacuum hoses.  There are several vacuum ports that are not supposed to have anything connected.
  • Changing the Oil: A great video put together by Scott on how to change your oil.
  • Air Filter Change: Scott shows us how to change the air filter including removing the necessary plastics.
  • DIY Air Filter: If you don’t want to spend a bunch of money on a new filter, you can build your own.
  • Fuel Filter: Some have found that there is no reason to replace the fuel filter.  Others have found the exact opposite.  I believe it is more of a bike-to-bike issue.  Some IPCRC members have had good luck with generic Goldwing filters that cost pennies on the dollar compared to the Hondaline part.  Others find that the Goldwing filters don’t always fit.
  • How to Replace a Fuel Filter: A great video from one of the IPCRCers on how to replace your fuel filter.
  • Leaking Head Gasket: Andrea sent me a few pictures of a bike that had a leaking head gasket.  After some TLC, it was back on the road again.
  • Connecting Rod Bearing: Andrea also found a bad connecting rod bearing.  A little bit of work and the bike lives to ride another day.
  • Choke Cable Replacement: If your choke cable breaks, don’t fret!  It isn’t too hard to replace.
  • Choke Cable Okay but not Working Properly: If your choke cable is okay but it doesn’t seem to help start the bike, you might have some clogged jets.
  • Carburetor Maintenance: Several things you might need to do if your PC runs rough, idles incorrectly, won’t rev beyond 2000 RPMs, or leaks a bunch of gas from the carbs or the carb drains
    • How Carburetors Work: An IPCRCer has a good write-up of how the carbs on a PC800 work and what all of the major parts do.
    • Carburetor Synchronization: Is your engine not smooth as silk?  Does it not purr like a kitten?  Then it might be time to synchronize your carbs.  This post and this post are good guides for the job.
    • Carburetor Cleaning and Rebuilding: On the IPCRC, go to the “Files” section and look for the “Tech. Info PC800” folder.  Inside that folder, search for “PC800 Carb Rebuild.doc” which will show you everything you need to do.
    • Carburetor Cleaning Without a Rebuild: Before completely rebuilding your carb, you might try flushing it out with Techron.  It works very well for some people.  I tried it and I definitely noticed a performance improvement.  However, sometimes your carb is so gunked up, you have to rebuild it.
    • Carb Vacuum Piston Boot Holes/Cracks: If you find a hole, tear, or crack in the rubber diaphragms in the carbs, you might try one of the solutions listed before ponying up the money for a new set.
    • Gasoline Pouring Out of the Carbs: There is a simple solution (usually) if you have a bunch of gas pouring out of the carbs.  This is what it looks like when gas starts pouring out.
    • Carburetor Not Syncing Properly: If you just did a rebuild, your vacuum diaphragms might not be seated correctly.
  • Oil filters: The discerning PC owner has his or her own preference for oil filters.  They range from the expensive but highly regarded OEM Hondaline filter to the cheap WalMart filter.  There are pros and cons to each and it is up to each PCer to decide which is right for their bike.
    • Oil Filter Comparison: This is a good comparison of the guts of various motorcycle oil filters.  Most of the info is rather old now though and designs inside of the filters might have changed.
    • Oil Filter Comparison and Disassembly: Another excellent comparison of filters.  There is also an opinion page that might be of some interest.
    • Even More Oil Filter Comparisons: Another good source of oil filter info.
    • Hondaline Oil Filter: Many believe that if it is good enough for Mother Honda, it is good enough for their PC.  I have been running a Honda filter on my bike simply because it is easy to find and I know it will work.
    • K&N Oil Filter: Some people use the K&N oil filter with good results.
    • Bosche Oil Filter: Some people swear by the Bosche filter and are very satisfied with it.
    • FRAM Oil Filter: Leland and others use the FRAM oil filter with good results.  Leland has one on each of his four bikes so I would say it’s a safe bet that FRAMs work well.
    • Purolator Oil Filter: At least one PCer has been using Purolator filters for 20+ years with good results.  Others like it, too.
    • WalMart SuperTech Oil Filter: Several PCers love their WalMart filters for both being inexpensive and reliable.
    • PC Racing FLO Stainless Steel Oil Filter: An oil filter that is reusable.  One PCer is currently using it that I’m aware of.  You have to clean the filter out with solvent at every oil change.
  • Spark Plug Tool: It is INCREDIBLY important that you use the right tool to remove the spark plugs from your PC800.  The original toolkit came with the proper plug socket.  Don’t try to use any old socket.  You either need to get an original tool (still available from Hondaline) or find a very thin-walled socket (even this won’t always work).  Otherwise you will crack things in the engine and break seals resulting in a major oil leak and very expensive repairs.  Some good pointers for changing your spark plugs can be found herehere, here, and here.
  • Engine Cutting Out: If your engine starts cutting out or dies, it could be due to several different reasons.  This is not an exhaustive list and YMMV.
  • Fuel Pump Failure: Once in a great while a PC800 will have a fuel pump fail.  The easiest way to check this is to pull off the fuel line at the petcock valve and crank the engine.  If fuel flows out in copious amounts, your pump works.  If not, you have a problem.
  • Automotive Fuel Hose: Several of the OEM fuel hoses for our bikes are no longer available.  I have been using automotive equivalent bulk hoses for quite some time.  You can, too.  Just remember, buy the slightly smaller ID size from the OEM.
  • Clutch Slave Cylinder / Crank Case Oil Seal: If you’ve been having troubles finding the part number for the oil seal that sits behind the clutch slave cylinder, try P/N 91204-MB0-013.
  • Rebuilding the Clutch Slave and Master Cylinders and Replacing the Clutch Line: If you decide that it’s time to rebuild your slave and master cylinders on the clutch, look for the part numbers listed in this IPCRC post.
  • Bleeding the Clutch and Brake Lines: Here’s a short guide on how to bleed your clutch and brake lines successfully.
  • Removing the Crank Case Covers: It can be difficult to remove the crank case covers if someone glued them on as Bruce found out.
  • Replace Your Spark Plugs: A great video showing how easy it is to replace your spark plugs.
  • Spark Plug Choices: This is a good thread with spark plug information in it.
  • The Importance of Correct Oil: If your clutch starts to slip really bad, this might be the reason.

Electrical System

  • How-to Replace a Battery on the PC800: Scott put together a great video on how to replace a batter on the PC800.  He also shows how to do a few other good things to the battery and electrical system.
  • Regulator/Rectifier and Available Amperage: Pogo wrote a very nice post about how the R/R and charging system works.  He believes that if you have an “upside down” charging system (12-13 volts at 4K rpm and 14 volts at idle), not all is lost.  To find the directions, go here and then search for “PC Charging System Troubleshooting Guide.doc”
  • Upside-Down Charging: Pogo has some thoughts on the upside-down charging that hits PC800s occasionally.
  • Regulator/Rectifier Explained: Seth presents a good explanation of how our R/Rs work.
  • When your Bike Suddenly won’t Start but the Lights Still Come on: There’s a chance that your battery just had an internal fault and needs to be replaced.
  • Re-Coloring the Horn, Start, Kill, and Hi/Lo Beam Switches: Over time the paint wears off of these switches.  If you would like it to look like factory, there is a good paint to use for the job.
  • Replacing the R/R and Stator Connectors: Sometimes for reasons not entirely clear to anyone, these connectors will get burned and melt.  There are two places (here and here) online that I know of that sell new connectors.  Someone who owned my bike previously already did the job for me.  It also would be useful for someone installing the hotwire mod (search on this page for more details on that mod).
  • Replacing the Stator: This excellent video shows exactly what you will have to do in order to replace your stator.
  • Sealing the Stator Grommet: One IPCRCer used some RTV to make extra sure that his stator wires were well sealed where they penetrate the crank case.  There are two grommets that normally do this.  The choice is yours what you do here.
  • Fuse Block Diagram: In case you lose the fuse block cover, this will help you figure out which fuse does what.
  • Headlight Bulb Change: There is a good write-up on the IPCRC on how to change out a headlight bulb.
  • How-To Replace your Headlight Bulb: Here is a good video of replacing your PC800’s headlight bulb.
  • Adjust Headlight Aim: Jesper made an EXCELLENT video of how to adjust the PC800’s headlight without having to remove any tupperwear.  It is so astoundingly easy to do that I am a bit embarrassed that I hadn’t figured it out myself.  Tim provides a bit more info on the procedure.
  • Many Bulbs Burning Out: If this is happening, CHECK YOUR VOLTAGE!  You might have a bad regulator/rectifier (R/R) or stator.  Or something else in your system could be giving you over-voltage problems.  Continuing to ride with this issue will almost surely cause electrical damage to your bike that will be hard and expensive to fix.
  • Fixing Turn Signal Switches: If you’re willing to operate on your turn signal switch, you might be able to bring it back from the dead.
  • Mud Wasps Cause Headlight Failure: One IPCRCer found a mud wasp nest in his run/stop switch which caused his headlight to not function.
  • Rear Brake Light Plastic Housing Assembly Doesn’t Want to Stay on the Bike: If the plastic assembly with the rear brake lights and turn signals keeps wanting to fall off, you should check this post out.

Fuel System

  • Petcock Rebuilding: If you have a persistent gas smell around your top shelter, you might need to rebuild your petcock.  There are several kits available as after market products.  An OEM rebuild kit also exists.  Some people also replace the petcock with a brass “T” and plug the vacuum line (video of how to do it is here).  There are good arguments on both sides of this debate.  Personally I’ve chosen to keep my petcock intact and rebuild it.  One note for people who get a rebuild kit: compare the springs of the rebuild kit to the stuff in the petcock already.  Some rebuild kits include the wrong springs.  Search this page for “petcock” for some additional links.
  • Gas Leaking from 4-way Vacuum Hose Barb Connector: If you are getting gas smells around your engine and can’t figure out where it is coming from, you might be having a little bit of gas leaking out from somewhere upstream of the 4-way vacuum hose barb connector.  The link goes to a thread on the IPCRC where we discussed what the root cause might be.  As of the time of writing this, a definite determination had not been made although the suggestions from IPCRCers are, in my opinion, probably correct.
  • Gas Smell that isn’t from your Petcock: If your petcock isn’t leaking, you might try checking your carb float bowls.
  • Maybe the Gas Smell is Our Own Fault: One PC’ers take on the common gas smell after we shut our bikes off.  I wouldn’t be too surprised if this is what is actually happening for many people.  Unless fuel economy is significantly reduced or you find drops of gas, personally I wouldn’t worry about a little fuel smell all that much.
  • Increase Your Gas Mileage: One PCer reports that adjusting his mixture setting above the standard factory set-point increased his gas mileage by 10-13 mpg (from 40mpg to 53mpg).
  • Throttle Cables: Lube these periodically or else you won’t be getting the best performance.
  • Lubing Throttle Cables: Don’t forget to lube your cables!  Your speedo cable, too.
  • Fuel Cut-Off Relay Wire Harness Testing: Phil has a good video showing how to test the wiring harness for functionality if you’re having troubles with your fuel pump getting power.

Instrument Panel

  • Changing bulbs: KidRicky’s video of changing out a light bulb for the instrument cluster.
  • Speedometer Cable: Make sure to lube your speedometer cable at the first sign of speedometer needle twitch.  Otherwise you’ll end up with a snapped cable.
  • Potential Sources of Speedometer Cable Failure: There are several different potential sources of cable failure.  Check everything before you replace a broken cable.
  • Dead Tachometer: If your tachometer stops working it could be a dead gauge (unlikely), a problem with where the sensor take-off is, or an issue with the needle getting stuck.
  • Dead Fuel Gauge: How to tell if it’s the gauge or something else.
  • Rattling Dash: If your dash is rattling, there are a few things you can do to try to quiet it down.

Cooling System

  • Antifreeze: What types of antifreeze are available and what I put in my bike.
  • Why You Need Silica-Free Antifreeze: Remember, do NOT use just any old antifreeze.
  • Radiator Cap: Rather than spend the money on a Hondaline cap (or if you’re in a pinch), Fred from the IPCRC informs me that any correctly sized 15 or 16 PSI cap that doesn’t have gripping ears sticking out will work (ie: just a round radiator cap).  Rather than pay the $45 or so bucks for Hondaline, you can get the same thing for about $5.
  • Radiator Cap Replacement: Be sure to replace your cap early and often.  Perhaps even carry a spare.
  • Replacing the Stubborn “B” Hose: I ended up opting not to replace that hose for the time being on my bike.  Others have successfully replaced it though.  It’s all about patience and removing the right bits of the motorcycle to gain access.
  • Overheating: If you get the dreaded gurgle and a thermostat that goes to the red, first flush  your coolant system and replace the coolant with something that DOES NOT have silicon in it (very very important).  If that still doesn’t fix it, replace the radiator cap.  If that still doesn’t fix it, check to make sure the fan is working properly. This is a good guide for diagnosing and trouble-shooting your fan.  If that doesn’t work, replace the thermostat.
  • Thermostat: An automotive replacement appears to be available.  Some IPCRCers are advising you replace your thermostat if you have any doubts about its operation.  The replacement price is much cheaper than having to tear apart your engine to replace seals.
  • Clogged Radiator: Sometimes, especially if you don’t have a Fenda Extenda (search this page for more info on that!), your PC’s radiator fins will get clogged with road debris, dirt, dead flies, and all sorts of other crud.  A good thorough cleaning will help get your PC operating in the correct temperature zone once again.
  • Checking Your Coolant Level: There are a bunch of good ideas in that thread for how you can easily check your coolant level.
  • Leaking Coolant From the Reservoir: Once in a great while the coolant reservoir can crack.  And I mean once in a great, GREAT while.  The linked post is the only time I have ever heard of one cracking in the last four years.
  • Coolant Leak from the Engine: There are O-rings (they are flat, not round) under stainless steel water pipes on the engine heads.  Sometimes these can go bad and will need to be replaced.

Final Drive

Suspension

  • Replacing Fork Seals: Some photos, a writeup, and links to relevant posts on the IPCRC on how to service your own forks.
  • Rear Wheel Dampers: A little info on replacing the rear wheel rubber dampers.  It seems that this doesn’t need to be done until you really want to.  But it is supposed to make the bike more responsive.  Next time I replace my rear tire, I will check this out and decide if I want to replace the parts or not.  They’re cheap enough, I might as well.
  • Anti-Dive Mechanism Leaks: Once in a great while, the anti-dive mechanism O-ring can fail and start leaking fluid.
  • Rear Wheel Squeal: If you have a rear wheel squeal, there are a few different things to check.  First though is to make sure you don’t have the “bird tweet” coming from your exhaust.  And if you do, learn to love it. :-)
  • Rear Wheel Dampers: When the back end gets a little wonky, it’s time to do a quick replacement of the rubber dampers.
  • Adjust Rear Shock Preload: Here’s how you adjust the preload on the rear shocks for a better ride.
  • Rear Suspension Squeak: There are some different reasons that your rear suspension can squeak.

Brakes

  • Fixing Leaking Calipers: Sometimes the front brake calipers can start leaking.  Some seals will need to be replaced.  While you’re at it, you should replace the brake lines, too.
  • Brake Pad Alternative Numbers: In case you are in a pinch and can’t get the proper Hondaline brake pads for your PC, these will fit.  However, they might not work quite as well as proper PC800 pads.
  • Brake Pulsing: If  your brakes start pulsing or grabbing strangely, you might have a stuck piston.
  • Bleeding Brakes: Don’t worry.  It isn’t too hard to bleed your brake and clutch lines.  You should do it every couple years to make sure you have nice, clean fluid.
  • Rear Brake Life: The rear brake shoes on a PC800 will last for a long, long time unless you are very hard on them.

Tires and Wheels

  • Front Tire Change: I replaced my front tire when I first got my PC.  Here are some photos of the process.
  • Front Wheel Plastic Cover: Troubles with getting the plastic to line up on the disk covers.  The end resolution was to take all of the plastic off of the wheel and start over again.
  • Polishing the Aluminum Rims: Make those rims sparkle and shine!
  • Valve Core Change:  If you are losing air, you can try replacing your valve core.  If you are lucky, it will fix the problem.  Otherwise, look to the valve stem and the tire.

Paint

  • ColorRite: They carry paint that matches all of our PCs.
  • Nail Polish: Some people using nail polish to successfully repair small scratches.  Link goes to one discussion thread on IPCRC.  Search for “nail polish” on there for other entries.
  • Spray Paint: One IPCRCer found a good rattle-can match for the 1989 PC lowers.  Honda paint part numbers are also provided.
  • SprayMax: Another type of paint system that some PCers have found works very well to repaint their bikes.
  • Rust-Oleum: Another option for PC800 paint.
  • Paintscratch: Another source for ColorRite-style paint.
  • DupliColor: Another paint choice option.
  • Restoring Faded Paint: An intrepid PCer lays out detailed instructions for restoring faded and worn paint on our PC800s.

Plastics, Trunk Pieces, Windshields, And other Exterior Bits

Frame

Miscellaneous

  • Heli-Coil to the Rescue: Have a stripped-out bolt hole?  Don’t know where to turn?  Try the magical Heli-Coil!
  • DIY Motorcycle Lift: IPCRCer Skye built his own motorcycle lift to save his knees while working on projects on his PC.

More to come when I get around to it.  Shoot me a note (email or leave a comment on this page) if you have stuff that I should add.  Happy to either host on my site or link to where you have it stored.

  1. Chris Dahl’s avatar

    Just noticed the company – G&J aircraft in Ontario, CA – is NOT in Canada – It’s in California – I was hoping it was in Canada as I just picked up a 1989 PC800 and was looking to upgrade the lines.

    Thanks for a great resource!
    Chris

    Reply

    1. DouglasVB’s avatar

      There are way too many places named Ontario. The one in Oregon is practically in Idaho, but we’ve got one too. I made a note next to G&J about it being a California-based company.

      Glad you found the resources useful!

      Reply

    2. Chris’s avatar

      The information you have here is extremely helpful – I just ordered the regulator/rectifier from the information provided here.
      Do you have any additional info on the highway pegs? I don’t think the “Mick-o-peg” option will work for me as I am 6’4″ with size 15 feet.
      Thanks
      Chris

      Reply

      1. DouglasVB’s avatar

        Hi Chris,

        Glad my list of links could help! If you have anything to add or anything you’d like me to investigate, let me know. I’m always open to learning new things about our wonderful bikes.

        You might be surprised with the Mick-O-Pegs. I am 6’3″ and have size 15 feet. Although I do only have a 33″ inseam. However, they work great for me. I mean, they’re not perfect, but at our height, nothing will be. I just did a 500 mile ride with the pegs on Saturday and didn’t have any problems. It was very nice to be able to change my riding posture. The big secrets are to 1) push them as far forward as you can, 2) try out the placement and adjust as desired, and 3) don’t expect to ride them like normal highway pegs. I place the front half of my feet on them. I don’t lock into them with my boot heel like I would on classic cruiser highway bar-mounted pegs.

        As I recall, Riding is Wonderful (the company that produces the Mick-O-Pegs) has some sort of an unconditional 90 day satisfaction guarantee. It’s worth checking out anway.

        Oh, and you might try posting on pc800.net (the IPCRC) to see if someone in your area has a pair who would let you sit on their bike to see how it feels. I wasn’t so lucky so I just took the plunge. I’m very glad I did.

        Reply

      2. Charles Jackson’s avatar

        Great Website and resourceful. If you every find more information regarding how to order the Althea bags for PC800, please let me know. I have been looking for some bags for the trunk and Althea bags seem to be what I am looking for.

        Reply

        1. DouglasVB’s avatar

          Charles,

          I’m glad you like the site! Try going to this link: http://www.douglasvanbossuyt.com/2009/12/15/athenas-pc800-trunk-liner-bags/#comments and looking at the comment that Athena left for her contact information.

          Happy bag hunting!

          Douglas

          Reply

        2. Alfred’s avatar

          Hello Douglas,
          I saw an entrance to the electrical method for changing the fuel-gauge readings. You mentioned this was in Dutch. I wrote an English explanation later, when I knew the precise details about it all together. Could you change the description and the link to IPCRC forums? It includes all the information one needs. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/ipcrc/message/95521 Thank you so much. Alfred

          The text is the following, I think a 2 Watt resistor is pretty much where I say 0,25 – 0,5 – 1 or 2 Watt but it should work if you have one. The resistor is also soldered to the plug itself without breaking into the wires. This should be a smart thing to do.

          For a few months I warned against the dangers of removing the sensor from the
          tank and told that adjusting the fuel gauge could also be performed by soldering
          a resistor of 330 Ohm, from an old radio or bought for only one or two dime in
          the shop, over the plug of the sensor near the tank or over the meter behind the
          instrument panel. The electrical plug above the sensor is by far most easy to
          reach. Connect it, wherever you can, parallel to the wires, shorting them out.
          The resistor would have to come with the color code Orange – Orange – Brown,
          with Gold or Silver for the tolerance. The resistor must be a 0,25 Watt minimum
          and can also be the physically bigger 1/2, 1 or 2 Watt. Do not forget to try it
          out first and notice the difference. With thanks to the Dutch PC800 forum.

          Surprisingly many owners want to do the fuel sensor tweak. Please write a review
          when you do it this way or have any ideas on the electrical approach. It will be
          much saver avoiding possible gas spill and leakage. Alfred

          Reply

          1. DouglasVB’s avatar

            Hi Alfred,

            Thanks for correcting my mistake! I updated the page. Hopefully this fall I’ll find the time to dig into my bike and do the modification you pioneered. It is going on a long to-do list of mods.

            Thanks again!

            Douglas

            Reply

          2. Paul Donahue’s avatar

            This website is a fabulous resource ! Im particularly interested in the MagicShine MJ-808 conversion for the PC800 that you are working on along with other safety and comfort improvements for the bike.

            Thank you for taking the time to build such a great website.

            Sincerely

            Paul Donahue
            ’96 PC800 owner

            Reply

            1. DouglasVB’s avatar

              Hi Paul!

              Thanks for the compliment :-) The best source, in my opinion, is the PC800 mailing list. I just am trying to organize a few things so it’s easier for people to find some of the key resources.

              My LED conversion is still in the works. I’m not satisfied with any of the bulbs on the market at the moment and haven’t figured out how to work around the self-canceling turn signal unit yet. My current idea is to build my own LED “bulbs” and use something like an Arduino or similar inexpensive microprocessor in place of the self-canceling turn signal unit. The reason to work around the unit is because it requires a specific range of wattage being pulled through the light system (or so reports seem to indicate). LEDs make that wattage too low and end up burning out the unit. Some people have put resistors into the lighting circuits but that defeats one of the two purposes of converting for me (to reduce total bike wattage load so I can run more heated gear, radio equipment, etc). Hopefully this fall/winter I’ll have some time to work on that project again.

              Let me know if there is anything you’d like me to do some research on, take pictures of, etc… I’m happy to post anything that would be useful for you and your PC.

              Cheers!

              Douglas

              PS: I’ve been away from the internet for about six weeks and am VERY behind on the PC800 listserv. In the next few weeks I’ll be catching up on what’s happened recently and adding new info from the wisdom of the list to this page.

              Reply

            2. Glenn Schechter’s avatar

              Hey !!!!!!!! anyone out there ever relocated there battery to there trunk on there PC800? If so are you happy you did. I find it a pain to take the plastic covers off every time I need to do something W/ the battery,charge or check and I am considering moveing it to the trunk.

              Reply

              1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                Hi Glenn,

                I know of one person who did but for reasons other than ease of access. Vermin’s “Cack” lost its charging circuitry on a trip to Copper Canyon in Mexico. He put a big truck battery in the trunk. Every night he’d pull the battery out of the trunk and recharge it on a big battery charger. Wash, rinse, repeat. Certainly it’s possible but considering with the proper battery, you won’t have to change it for up to eight years at a time, might as well just leave it in place :-)

                Cheers,

                Douglas

                Reply

              2. Glenn Randle’s avatar

                Another “Glenn” here with an 89′ in NC mountains. Have had it since new.

                Thanks for all the info & links. I’ve always wondered about what other PC800 owners do with/to their bikes. Too bad of the “cult” status….I’d sort’a like to collect a few of them if they were easier with low miles & low prices.

                I after checking out all the info here I don’t think I’ve seen anyone who has “bored & stroked” a PC800 yet. That seems like the most common thing to do for more power for just about any engine. Why not a PC900 or PC1000? Seems like a good match for the 1100 final drive rear gearbox swap. Seems a lot simpler than trying to engineer FI. Just wondering.

                Btw, I just got a job as a Moto-Patrol for bicycle races on my PC800. I will begin next month. I can’t believe that I’ll be getting paid to ride! Almost as good as getting paid to drink beer, or screw !! And I KNOW that won’t happen. LOL!! Sounds like fun anyway. I’ll let you know how it goes.

                Cheers,
                GlennR

                Reply

                1. Glenn Randle’s avatar

                  sorry about the typos…no edit button.

                  Reply

                2. DouglasVB’s avatar

                  Hi Glenn!

                  Someone is working on boring out a PC at this very moment. He will be the first person to do it that I am aware of. I would suspect that the reason others haven’t done it already is because they just want to ride their bikes and not mess with anything mechanical under the plastics. My FI project is more about learning about FI and having fun doing it to my motorcycle than getting any major performance increase. I’m also toying with the idea of putting NOx and a turbo on it. Again, more to learn than to win a drag race with a Hayabusa.

                  With regards to a VT1100 rear end, several people have done it. It allows the bike to go a little faster with fewer RPM but makes it a bit tall-geared when starting from a dead stop.

                  Low mileage PCs can still be had at a reasonable price. Just keep watching Craigslist and the PC800 Buy/Sell website that Leland maintains. That’s how several PCers can have three or four or more bikes. I wish I could have two. One to tinker on and one to ride!

                  Cheers,

                  Douglas

                  Reply

                3. Glenn Randle’s avatar

                  That’s cool to hear somebody is boring out a PC. Do you know what cc size it will become? I’d think it will need some carb work too to increase the fuel flow. I don’t think it’s as simple as just increasing the idle adjustment, but that would be nice if it is.

                  Are they also planning to do the VT1100 rear end? Is that simple and/or inexpensive to do?

                  I’ve read some riders are using Metzelers. Are they a slightly smaller diameter than the Dunlops? If the rear is, it might help with the VT1100 being a little too steep.

                  It seems the PC’s main weak link for longevity is the body plastic. Any good tips or advice, besides “Be careful.”?

                  I have seen some good deals on Craigslist, but the truth is (probably for most of us) it’s really hard to justify a twin to the 89′ that I have. Although I will never sell my PC I also enjoy other toys and they aren’t nearly so hard to “explain” to the wife….She loves jetskis and would much rather see us get a boat than another PC800….even if it is another beautiful color. But she did recently ask for her own little motorcycle to ride around on the dirt roads through the mountains to visit friends nearby. I found a nice little Yamaha XT225 dual sport that’s perfect for a beginner. It seems to be a cult bike like the PC, with it’s own website too. I never expected to join a cult….now it seems I’m in two!

                  It will be interesting to hear how your FI project goes. Do most streetbikes have FI now? I’ve noticed a few dual sports / dirt bikes do. How much do you think it will cost, besides the countless hours of R&D? Hopefully you’ll discover the “easy way” before spending too much time and money. Most of my projects tend to go through a lot of the “hard ways” first. ;)

                  Reply

                  1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                    I think they are planning to take it to 1000cc. Watch the IPCRC for more details over the next few months. I believe he’s swapping on a bigger set of carbs during the work. Not too sure of particulars but there is someone who knows what he is doing who is working on it. My only real concern is that it will significantly shorten the PC’s engine life.

                    The VT1100 rear end has already been done a few times. Search on this page for “VT1100″ for relevant links. As far as I’m aware, you only need to buy the right model year of VT1100 rear end to do the swap. A few hundred bucks and it’s done.

                    I’m not particularly careful with my plastics and they’ve held up just fine. There are several products (look for “plastic repair” or something like that on this page for relevant links) that can mend almost any broken plastic bit. I would say that lost pieces and road rash are our bigger enemies. Even that isn’t a big deal if you don’t mind repainting panels. Just don’t tip over and you’ll be fine :-)

                    I’ve found the PC800 to be a very capable back roads, dirt and gravel bike. Maybe your wife will graduate up to the PC when she realizes how much stuff you can hold in one!

                    The majority of street bikes have FI now. Honda even has FI cruises. So does Harley. My rough estimate is, with one-time development costs, I will end up spending about $1000 plus my time converting my bike to FI. I’ve already looked at a few “hard ways” and am now going toward the “easy way” to get it done.

                    I have a couple other projects kicking around in the back of my mind such as replacing the stator/rotor/RR with a Goldwing alternator setup. That will require fabbing up a brand new left crank case cover. The guy who is doing the PC1000 engine bore project is probably going to help me with this idea. He’s got a little CNC and has made crank case covers for other bikes in the past.

                    Another thing I have been meaning to do is convert the whole bike over to LED for brakes, turn signals, and dash lights. That’ll give me some serious power savings so I can get more heated gear for the long winter months. Also for more electric toys :-) I want to build in a CB radio and also maybe an amateur radio as well.

                    And finally, I’m also thinking about making an auxiliary fuel tank that would fit in the trunk of the bike to extend maximum range. I’ve got the plans sketched out but FI takes priority at the moment. All of these projects are really just for fun. It’s not like our wonderful bikes really NEED any upgrades :-)

                    Cheers,

                    Douglas

                    Reply

                  2. Glenn Randle’s avatar

                    Don’t tell my wife that the PC is okay on the gravel…..that was my excuse for buying a Suzuki DR-Z400S! ;)

                    I’m hoping that the Yamaha will lead her to eventually trying out the PC after she’s had a bit of experience riding. Then we’ll “need”another street bike.

                    I’ve never seen the Goldwing stator (or the PC one), but if it fits into the the PC perhaps you’d only need a spacer made that would allow you to use the PC’s original cover. Seems like it would be a lot simpler to make than an entire cover.

                    There are a lot of folks switching to LEDs on the dual sports. I’d try them before the stator swap. Might be all you need, unless you’re planning the “PC fridge” mod. ;)

                    I’d love to add an extra gallon or two to my bike. That’s it’s biggest shortfall IMO. I think placing it in the trunk makes good sense. The “natural” idea is to place it under the airbox cover that looks like a gas tank, but that would be a PITA and KISS projects get done quicker and work better. It shouldn’t be too hard after you find the right container. I bet you could sell those kits to almost everybody that owns a PC.

                    Reply

                    1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                      The newer Goldwings use what is basically a car alternator external to the engine that has a shaft coupler to the transmission. I’m thinking of doing the same thing or just getting a small car alternator. Then I could run some good driving lights, radios, heated gear for me and my passenger, beer fridge in the trunk, etc. :-) And also eventually I want to put EL panels on the bike and on my riding suit to turn my bike into something from Tron!

                      Someone actually has placed an extra gas tank above the faux tank. Search for “7.7 Gallon Gas Tank” on this page. That IPCRCer has mad fabrication skills! The big benefit as I see it to using the trunk is that it will keep the center of gravity low. The main drawback is that we lose trunk storage space. I could always throw one of those “beer keg” tanks on a rear rack like one of my buddies did to his Harley recently but then the center of gravity would REALLY get screwed up. And it’d look funny :-)

                      Cheers,

                      Douglas

                      Reply

                    2. terry lafever’s avatar

                      I am needing some help, I recently purchased a 1989 Honda Pacific Coast 800, I rode it, stopped got back on to ride again and it wouldnt start is there a problem with the charging system that I dont know about if you could advise me i would appreciate it. Thanks

                      Reply

                      1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                        Hi Terry,

                        I suggest that you join the IPCRC at pc800.net (it’s a Yahoo group). There are MANY much more knowledgeable people than me there who can help you troubleshoot your problem.

                        Cheers,

                        Douglas

                        Reply

                      2. Steven LeBlanc’s avatar

                        Douglas,
                        A fabulous wealth of information here. I am hoping you know one more little bit.
                        I think I have an oil leak from my oil pressure switch. In trying to tighten the switch I discovered that it is impossible to do. Do you have any experience with this?

                        Thanks,
                        Steven……

                        Reply

                        1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                          Steven,

                          I haven’t encountered that specific problem before. Did you disassemble the necessary subframes to get to the switch? You might try asking the question on the PC800 forums at pc800.net. Everything I know about the Pacific Coast, I learned from that forum. It is a true wealth of knowledge!

                          Cheers!

                          Douglas

                          Reply

                        2. Ben Zeppa’s avatar

                          Thanks for putting together all the PC information in one place so I can access it, It has been a big help. I am a new owner and it is nice to read about the proper way to do things from riders who have so much knowledge.

                          I recently did the rear tail light and license plate LED switch and I really like the way it works. I installed HyperLites to the rear of my bike and their LEDs made the stock bulbs look like lit candles. Putting the LEDs in made for a much better match. Replacing those three bulbs made a big difference in the draw on the stator, and my voltmeter attests to that. I would do the front and rear directional signals next but I am afraid that I do not have the talent to do the mods necessary so I will not damage my cancelling system.

                          Anyway, thank you again for taking the time to save us new riders some time. I, for one, greatly appreciate your effort.

                          Ben Zeppa

                          Reply

                          1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                            Hi Ben,

                            I’m glad that this page has been useful. Please let me know if there is anything that I need to update or areas you would like more content within.

                            Do you have links to the various LED bulbs that you purchased? Any photos of the finished product? I would be interested in adding any information you have to the list of links so that other people can benefit from it in the future.

                            Converting the turn signals without damaging the cancelling system is not actually that bad if you are willing to accept that you will need to install load balancing resistors. I actually have a second PC800 at my disposal… maybe I should do the conversion on that bike so that there is a good pictorial how-to guide for that…

                            Cheers!

                            Douglas

                            Reply

                          2. Ting’s avatar

                            Modifications to the (awesome and very useful) page:

                            1) Ting’s self made luggage rack failed by breaking the passenger backrest support arm while crossing a railroad track. This required Ting to learn the art of welding. Ugly weld, but it is now fixed. Although I do keep my passengers to under 300 lbs now.
                            2) Oil filters. I used the Walmart ST6607 oil filter and it is no longer produced. I have switched to Purolator and don’t have the number in front of me. I will repost it when I get home. Mucho gracias for your awesome and helpful page.

                            Ting….Jonathan….SchwingTing…..that boy with all them dang lights.

                            Reply

                            1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                              Ting,

                              Learning to weld is on the “to-do” list for me. You’re ahead of me there! What did you have on the luggage rack that was over 300 lbs?

                              Cheers!

                              Douglas

                              Reply

                            2. Glenn Schechter’s avatar

                              Hi Douglas and fellow PCer’s,
                              I just read the different posts and saw one from me about a year ago asking if anyone relocated there battery to the trunk. I ended up doing it. I was having problems back then w/ my charging system. After I relocated it, I was givin the PC I’m parting out and the first thing I did was take off the stator and magnetic flywheel and havn’t had any problems since.
                              Funny thing I plane to make my own rack. I worked In auto body shops for over 30 years so I think I’ll be fine.
                              I do have a question. Does anyone own a driver-to-passenger intercom? Can I have the pro’s and con’s please. I found one one line called Nady PMC-2X , It runs alittle over $100.00 It dosn’t mention if the passenger can comunicate to the driver when ever they want to, but I would think they can.
                              By any chance someone out there that has one and no longer have a use for it. I dont want the big system that gets hooked to a CB that is on the M/C. Just a little compact system.
                              I have no problem w/ receving phone calls and as I have posted many times I HAVE AN ENGINE W/ LOW MILES FOR SALE. Hey! it would be a great engine to bore out to 1000cc’s, The engine is in great condition, but of course it needs a stator and flywheel.Thats it everything on engine is like new and much better then the one on E-bay.
                              Sincerely, Glenn (949)633-5074

                              Reply

                            3. DARIN KRAMER’s avatar

                              Hello Doug
                              Hello Everyone

                              My name is Darin and I recently became the proud owner of a 96. After researching maxi scooters and comparing price to value decided that the pc can’t be beat. I needed a commuter cause work is a 85 mile round trip. Been loving the whole experience. I have a small problem. The bolt that holds the foot shift lever has backed out. I’ve got the service manual for the bike but not every nut and bolt is listed in any manual of any vehicle. I can’t locate info on what size bolt. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

                              Darin Kramer

                              Reply

                              1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                Hi Darin,

                                Be sure to check out the PC800 listserv at pc800.net. It is the best place for immediate advice. I do my best to capture what is posted there and link to it here but if you need help in a hurry, go to pc800.net to ask a question.

                                That bolt is probably listed on the microfiche for the bike. I believe the bolt you are looking for is on this page: http://www.pc800parts.org/PC800PLPageG6.html

                                Cheers!

                                Douglas

                                Reply

                              2. Tom Wydeven’s avatar

                                It should be a 6mm, 1.0p X 30 lg. 10m hex head

                                Reply

                              3. Steve Beckham’s avatar

                                I just wanted to thank you for your site on the PC 800. I’ve always loved the bike and on Saturday I’ll be taking ownership of a 1994 with about 46K miles on it. I’ve been riding an ST1100 for about 5 years and have had a number of other bikes, but I expect that, keeping it well-maintained, the PC will be my ride for a long time to come. God and the vagaries of life willing.

                                Anyway, as I’ve been looking forward to becoming a PC rider, I’ve found your site to be extraordinarily useful and informative. I hope you don’t mind if I send you an occasional question.

                                Grace and Peace,
                                Steve

                                Reply

                                1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                  Steve,

                                  I’m glad that the site has been useful! Please send me all the questions you want. While I have a lot of information archived, the absolute best source remains the IPCRC forum at pc800.net. They can usually answer within a few minutes to a few hours while it takes me sometimes a day or two.

                                  If you’re ever in the general Oregon area, give me a shout and let’s go for a ride!

                                  Cheers!

                                  Douglas

                                  Reply

                                2. Darin’s avatar

                                  Hi Douglas

                                  I was wondering if anybody had tried the Mequiares plastic restorer and polish on either the windshields, tupperware or both and how it turned out?
                                  Dk

                                  Reply

                                  1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                    Hi Darin,

                                    Not to my knowledge but the best place to ask that question is on the IPCRC listserv at pc800.net. I bet someone at some point has tried it. And if not, I bet someone would be willing to try it on one of their broken pieces of tupperwear. You can tell them that I sent you!

                                    Cheers!

                                    Douglas

                                    Reply

                                  2. Stacie’s avatar

                                    Great links and information, but I will be silly until I find an easy way (or at least HOW) to remove the rear seat. Do you happen to have a link for this that I can’t see on what is already above? (or perhaps I missed it?) Please help!

                                    Reply

                                    1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                      Hi Stacie

                                      There are two bolts just behind the rear seat in the trunk space. Look just behind the seat right where the fake leather ends. they are on either side of the base of the trunk lid gas strut/shock that holds the lid open. Let me know if you are still having problems and I can see about taking a photo of them for you.

                                      Cheers!

                                      Douglas

                                      Reply

                                    2. Tom Wydeven’s avatar

                                      Synchronizing the cams: Doug, found your site very useful. I have a close friend (78 yrs young) that has a 97 PC. With 65k on it. Developed oil leaks. Turns out, it needed to be resealed. Head and base GKTs, plus cam plugs and o-rings. Also, shifter shaft seal.Got a Honda manual, and went to town removing the engine. One thing for sure is to pay attention to the synchronization of the cam timing between the two cylinders (it’s in the manual). Also, lifting up the cam cover slowly, paying attention to the tappets (hoping they drop into there pockets in the head, as not to loose the cam shim orientation. (whew, did good on that one). Pictures, as the job went along (thanks to the digital age) helps a lot. The factory manual was not real user friendly. Honda’s earlier manuals were better.
                                      It was interesting reading the SAAB reference: I was driving SAAB’s and Harleys before they were a yuppy thing to do. Also owned several Honda’s in my younger days. (I’m 62 years young) Owned two strokes, 99’s, 900Ts, and 9000’s. Shovels, Evo’s and Twin cams. I am also a proficient mechanic for all of my life. (had to be, for what I drive, LOL) I work in industry for my pay and bennys, and have a nice back yard shop. Work mostly on SAAB’s and HD’s. This PC has my interest, it was a challenging job, that went well. I’ve been sending my friend progress pics (he’s spending winter in AZ) (I’m in WI) as the job progressed. I have driven many miles along this bike out West. This PC has been in many states, with out a problem. (in fact I had to ride B, while my stator was replaced under warrantee in Rapid City) LOL.
                                      Keep up the good work on this site. And thanks a lot for all the good information. I want my friend to enjoy some more good trouble free miles. thx TT

                                      Reply

                                      1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                        Hi Tom!

                                        Thanks for the comment! I am very surprised that your buddy’s bike needed the head and base gaskets. I can’t recall very many other PC800s needing those gaskets replaced. My bike had to have its cam plugs and shifter lever seal replaced to stop a few annoying leaks. Another place I had a leak from was the air box. Actually… I still haven’t quite fixed that leak. Oil vapors from the transmission get sucked up via a breather hose to the air box to be burned in the engine. Sometimes those vapors become small pools of oil in the air box. This isn’t a big problem except that our old air boxes are starting to leak the oil rather than burn it. The air box boots are separate parts that were glued into the main air box body. My solution was to use high temp sealant around the joint between the boots and the air box body. I still have a small leak from one of the boots that I need to address. Another place I’ve had issues is with the oil filter itself. It can back off by a little bit and allow oil to leak there. I’ve also seen oil leak out from behind the clutch slave cylinder and the shaft that services the water pump. Did the bike live in a very hot climate or do a lot of stop-and-go riding over its 65k life?

                                        Last year I rebuilt a Honda XL500S engine. The cams on that bike were a real bear to synchronize properly. Do you still have photos of the process you used to align the cams? I could post it on my website if you wanted so that other people in the future can use the reference.

                                        Your friend should easily get 300,000 miles out of his PC before it needs any additional major work. There are many examples of PCs running that long or longer.

                                        Cheers!

                                        Douglas

                                        Reply

                                      2. Tom Wydeven’s avatar

                                        Doug, the thermostate was froze open, and out west we had a lot of stop and go traffic, the bike did get hot a couple of times. After removing all the tupperware and cowling around the motor, you could clearly see weeping around the gasket areas of the base and head areas, along with cam plugs and the o-rings. It was leaking pretty good towards the end. I washed the motor before removing it (it was easier). I keep telling my friend. I want this bike when you decide to give it up ( I hope this will be years from now) he’s 78 years young and in good health. You do not have to post this note, I’m using this, as an avenue to communicate.

                                        Reply

                                        1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                          Tom,

                                          AHA! A stuck thermostat can definitely cause weaping seals all around. I actually have a dead PC800 engine that I am borrowing from a friend. The engine met its end in similar circumstances. It sounds like you caught the problem soon enough that your friend’s bike’s engine should have many hundreds of thousands of miles left in it.

                                          If you are thinking of buying a PC800, you might check out the http://www.pc800buysell.org/ website. Leland does a good job of listing all of the PCs for sale that we are aware of. One guy in my local area has a PC for sale right now even.

                                          Cheers!

                                          Douglas

                                          Reply

                                        2. Christopher’s avatar

                                          Doug, phenomenal list of PC800 stuff. Well done!
                                          I was wondering, with the advent of 3D printing upon us, would you happen to know if there is a CAD ( or other appropriate file format) of the Wong Wing? If not, and you being an engineer and all, could you creat one? I would be willing to compensate you for the file and I’m sure others would be as well.

                                          Cheers!

                                          Chris

                                          Reply

                                          1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                            Hi Chris,

                                            I don’t know of any CAD files for the Wong Wing but if someone had an existing Wong Wing and access to good CMM equipment, they could create a CAD file pretty easily. Probably the original manufacturer and original designer of the Wong Wing have CAD files still but I’ve never been in touch with them directly. Wong Wings are incredibly rare these days.

                                            Cheers!

                                            Douglas

                                            Reply

                                          2. Steveo_UK’s avatar

                                            Hi. Just got my PC back on the road after a three year hiatus. Loving your site and links all over again. Started digging around for parts. Am I being daft to even begin to look for trunk liners or to try and contact the person who made the aftermarket ones?

                                            Reply

                                            1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                              Hi Steveo,

                                              It can’t hurt to contact Athena about her trunk liner bags. When I bought mine several years ago she said that she was going to get out of the business but maybe she is still making a few bags here and there. The bags that I got are very high quality. At the least, maybe she can give you the patterns so you can sew your own?

                                              Cheers!

                                              Douglas

                                              Reply

                                            2. George Zepernick (Zep)’s avatar

                                              Douglas,

                                              Great site! Thanks for all the useful info. I must take issue, however, with the contention that the PC is dirt capable, at least as far as Colorado dirt is concerned. On a foothills ride west of Denver this week I was herded onto a county track due to a detour around a wildfire. Turned out to be thirty miles of extreme washboard alternating with six-inch deep pea gravel. The front end washed out every other bend. Too much speed and the washboard tries to toss you into the trees, too slow and the front wheel just plows. Desperately needed more suspension travel. My old body is still feeling it. I’ll be sticking to the macadam in future, fire or no fire. Still love the bike!

                                              Zep

                                              Reply

                                              1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                                Hi Zep,

                                                Yuck! That sounds like a rotten detour. We don’t have much washboard here in western Oregon on the forest access roads but we do have some deep and soft gravel. I went down a year or two ago doing about 15 mph when my front wheel washed out in deep sand and gravel. I stopped doing as much riding on gravel and mud roads after that.

                                                Cheers!

                                                Douglas

                                                Reply

                                              2. Bryan Ryder’s avatar

                                                Great information here, saved it to my favorites

                                                Reply

                                                1. william’s avatar

                                                  Love your work. Thanks. 90 with 33k

                                                  Reply

                                                  1. DouglasVB’s avatar

                                                    It’s a great bike!

                                                    Reply

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